Lessons learned from a habitual outdoor runner

Tag: exercise Page 1 of 2

Pursue health

An object at rest remains at rest, or if in motion, remains in motion at a constant velocity unless acted on by a net external force. – Newton’s first law (extrapolation)

Our mortal bodies left to themselves will self-destruct. We must pursue healthy nutrition and physical movement to counter balance. Our bodies don’t appear to be designed to lounge in comfort for extended periods, in fact, when in excess, comfort turns into discomfort. This becomes more obvious the longer we occupy this form.

I exercise everyday. Every-single-day. Why? In my mid 30’s the above became very apparent, yet I did what we humans usually do, ignored it and somehow believed the 18 year-old version of me was going to show up again. He didn’t.

In my mid 40’s the visits to the physicians and modern equipment and medications were being prescribed. If things were going to get better for this body someone had to do something. Oh, that was me, nobody else could do it. I wrote about this in more detail in some of my early posts on this blog.

So now each day I pursue my health.

If it’s going to be, it’s up to me.

Useful tools @ Original Strength

A friend told me to check out Tim Anderson over at Original Strength and I am glad I did. I am still checking out the videos over at YouTube as there are tons of useful resources available to introduce some very helpful tools.

The concept of a “reset” is an underlying theme and one key routine is rocking. At first I was thinking that is too simple, however, when I started I quickly realized how much work my knee still required. These resets are great physical therapy!

The knee is getting better. While it’s not ready for running, flexibility is improving and pain intensity lowering. Riding the bike is not a problem for it, for which I am very grateful. I have been able to walk two to three miles a day. I wish I could say the walks are pain free, but not yet.

2018 Running Summary Data

This post simply contains the running data for 2018 from Garmin Connect.

Screenshot from 2019-01-02 09-43-55


Screenshot from 2019-01-02 10-26-04


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Run for life

We’ve heard this said numerous ways, as in:

  • I’m running for my life (being chased?)
  • I want to run for my entire life (accomplishment)
  • Running is my life (or focus)
  • Do these things, and you can run more/longer (competitive)

For me, running is one of the key elements that keeps me vital. Genetics, poor life choices, time, and circumstance are all influencing my physical presence and yours. Running has proven to be a significant asset in my journey to live out my purpose.

Several studies have pointed out the benefits of gut health and the impact on our longevity based on our personal diet (which is what works best for our body). Similarly, there have been studies showing that physical exercise like running can actually extend (rebuild) the age shrinking telomeres in our DNA structures.

I see running as my fountain of youth, regardless of what life brings, I’m doing what I can with the body I have to keep up with the changes and challenges being thrown at it.

You’re slim, why count calories?

Screenshot from 2018-12-06 09-50-44

People watch us. Over time they may be curious enough to ask some questions as to what makes you tick.

Most people in my acquaintance did not know me when I had a 38″+ waist and was around 230 pounds. When or if they hear I run a lot often the conversation turns to my habits. Some have found it strange that I track my calories after losing the weight so many years ago.

I do record my food, and my Garmin tools document my exercise. When I say I track my calories, it’s more superficial than scientific. I know folks who are into the macro-nutrients, proteins, carbs, various fat sources, etc. I think those are great, but they bore me to sleep.

I am in health-maintenance mode, where I want to remain healthy to do battle against the forces of time and environment. The better prepared the soldier, generally, the more success in fighting.

I saw a doctor posted an article on LinkedIn called “Health: One Measure to Rule Them All” where he explores so many elements of our healthy living. A few quotes from his article:

We do not routinely direct our collective will at the true, root causes of our decline.

Even despite the terrible toll of opioids, depression, despair, and suicide- diet is the single leading cause of premature death in America today.

Keep fighting the good fight!

 

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